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Museum / Archive
Aylmer-Malahide Museum and Archives
Material
Paper
Museum / Archive
Aylmer-Malahide Museum and Archives
Collection
Aylmer Museum Photo Collection
Description
Browns Comedy Co. - Opera House - 'The Silver King'
Material
Paper
Category
Communication Artifacts
Sub-category
Advertising Medium
Accession Number
2003-002-0031
Length
35.50
Width
14.00
Units
cm
Images
Museum / Archive
Aylmer-Malahide Museum and Archives
Material
metal, wood, cloth
Museum / Archive
Aylmer-Malahide Museum and Archives
Description
A tool comprised of a heavy, metal head and a wooden handle. Handle is light- coloured and is inserted through a hole in the center of the head and secured with two metal pegs set into the top end of the handle. Majority of handle is wrapped in a discoloured dirty stained material secured with a tied string.
Material
metal, wood, cloth
Condition Information
In good condition, some corroding of metal, gauze frayed.
Category
T&E for Materials
Sub-category
Woodworking T&E
Accession Number
2007-003-0043
Length
30.50
Width
7.00
Height
14.50
Units
cm
Item History
Adzes are used for smoothing or carving wood in hand woodworking.
Images
Museum / Archive
Aylmer-Malahide Museum and Archives
Date Range From
1853
Date Range To
1869
Museum / Archive
Aylmer-Malahide Museum and Archives
Description
Ambrotype of an unknown man and woman in a case. The image of the man is on the left side dressed in a suit and the image of the woman wearing a bonnet holding a book is in the right side. The images protected under glass, and there are ornate gold metal frames arouund the images. The outside of the case has a design on the front and back cover. Ambrotypes were popular from 1854 until the mid-1860s In 1851 London sculptor Frederick Scott Archer announced his new form of photography, the wet collodion processes. This combined the most successful of daguerreotype and calotype negative methods, but it was more simple and less expensive, allowing it to be commercially viable. This method was extremely popular and became the foundation for photography for the following 140 years. In this method, a glass plate was coated with the wet collodion solution that contained light-sensitive silver salts and was exposed while the plate was still wet. Photographs had to be taken within 15 minutes of coating the plate so a portable dark room was required. The exposure time was less than daguerreotypes and calotypes, making outdoor photography easier. A sharp glass negative image was created that captured details. Positive copies could be made from the glass negative, usually albumen prints on paper. The images were sharper than those made by the calotype process and are less likely to fade. Ambrotypes, or wet collodion positives, were formed by painting the back of the glass negative image with black paint, or by placing a piece of black card there. The image was often put in a protective case, similar to that of a daguerreotype. In 1854 James Ambrose Cutting took out several patents relating to the process. He is thought to be responsible for coining the term ‘ambrotype.’ Ambrotypes were much less expensive to produce than daguerreotypes and they could be viewed from every angle as they did not have the mirror-like metallic surface that could often make daguerreotypes difficult to view. While the daguerreotype exposure time took several minutes, the wet collodion process for ambrotypes drastically reduced the exposure time, taking from a few seconds to a minute. The shortened exposure time and the low price helped increase their popularity of ambrotypes over daguerreotypes. By the late 1850s the ambrotype was more popular than the daguerreotype. By the mid-1860s the ambrotype itself was being replaced by the tintype and paper print.
Condition Information
There is a chip on the top of the case. The background of the image of the woman is chipping away revealing the remnants of a fabric backing.
Category
Communication Artifacts
Sub-category
Documentary Artifact
Subject of Image
Man and Woman
Accession Number
2014-011-0061
Date Range From
1853
Date Range To
1869
Length
7
Width
2.5
Height
8
Units
cm
Dimension Remarks
Dimensions are of the case when it is closed. When the case is open it is 13.7 in length.
Images
Museum / Archive
Aylmer-Malahide Museum and Archives
Date Range From
1853
Date Range To
1869
Museum / Archive
Aylmer-Malahide Museum and Archives
Description
Ambrotype of a baby in a case. The giftform identifies the baby as Junius Martin. This could be an example of postmortem photography as Junius Martin was born in 1854 in Aylmer and died two years later on August 13, 1856. He is buried in the Burdick Cemetery near Summers Corners. The cushioned insert that would have been inside of the inside cover of the case is missing. The image of the baby is protected under glass. The baby is under a checkered blanket. Around the image is an ornate oval gold metal frame. The outside of the case has a design on the front and back cover. Ambrotypes were popular from 1854 until the mid-1860s In 1851 London sculptor Frederick Scott Archer announced his new form of photography, the wet collodion processes. This combined the most successful of daguerreotype and calotype negative methods, but it was more simple and less expensive, allowing it to be commercially viable. This method was extremely popular and became the foundation for photography for the following 140 years. In this method, a glass plate was coated with the wet collodion solution that contained light-sensitive silver salts and was exposed while the plate was still wet. Photographs had to be taken within 15 minutes of coating the plate so a portable dark room was required. The exposure time was less than daguerreotypes and calotypes, making outdoor photography easier. A sharp glass negative image was created that captured details. Positive copies could be made from the glass negative, usually albumen prints on paper. The images were sharper than those made by the calotype process and are less likely to fade. Ambrotypes, or wet collodion positives, were formed by painting the back of the glass negative image with black paint, or by placing a piece of black card there. The image was often put in a protective case, similar to that of a daguerreotype. In 1854 James Ambrose Cutting took out several patents relating to the process. He is thought to be responsible for coining the term ‘ambrotype.’ Ambrotypes were much less expensive to produce than daguerreotypes and they could be viewed from every angle as they did not have the mirror-like metallic surface that could often make daguerreotypes difficult to view. While the daguerreotype exposure time took several minutes, the wet collodion process for ambrotypes drastically reduced the exposure time, taking from a few seconds to a minute. The shortened exposure time and the low price helped increase their popularity of ambrotypes over daguerreotypes. By the late 1850s the ambrotype was more popular than the daguerreotype. By the mid-1860s the ambrotype itself was being replaced by the tintype and paper print.
Condition Information
The front of the case and back of the case have separated and part of the spine has broken off. The edge of the image is discoloured.
Category
Communication Artifacts
Sub-category
Documentary Artifact
Subject of Image
Baby
Accession Number
1986-029-0062
Date Range From
1853
Date Range To
1869
Length
8.3
Width
2
Height
9.5
Units
cm
Dimension Remarks
Dimensions are of the case when it is closed. When the case is open it is 16.5 in length.
Images
Museum / Archive
Aylmer-Malahide Museum and Archives
Date Range From
1853
Date Range To
1869
Museum / Archive
Aylmer-Malahide Museum and Archives
Description
Ambrotype of a young woman in a case. The woman is wearing a black dress. Her necklace and rings have been hand-tinted gold and her cheeks have been hand-tinted to be rosey. She is sitting on a chair beside a table and her arm is resting on the table. There is a book on the table. The inside cover of the case is lined with a patterned velvet. The image is protected under glass and around the image is an ornate gold metal frame. The outside of the case has a design including flowers and birds on the front and back cover. The woman also appears in ambrotype 2014-011-0059. Ambrotypes were popular from 1854 until the mid-1860s In 1851 London sculptor Frederick Scott Archer announced his new form of photography, the wet collodion processes. This combined the most successful of daguerreotype and calotype negative methods, but it was more simple and less expensive, allowing it to be commercially viable. This method was extremely popular and became the foundation for photography for the following 140 years. In this method, a glass plate was coated with the wet collodion solution that contained light-sensitive silver salts and was exposed while the plate was still wet. Photographs had to be taken within 15 minutes of coating the plate so a portable dark room was required. The exposure time was less than daguerreotypes and calotypes, making outdoor photography easier. A sharp glass negative image was created that captured details. Positive copies could be made from the glass negative, usually albumen prints on paper. The images were sharper than those made by the calotype process and are less likely to fade. Ambrotypes, or wet collodion positives, were formed by painting the back of the glass negative image with black paint, or by placing a piece of black card there. The image was often put in a protective case, similar to that of a daguerreotype. In 1854 James Ambrose Cutting took out several patents relating to the process. He is thought to be responsible for coining the term ‘ambrotype.’ Ambrotypes were much less expensive to produce than daguerreotypes and they could be viewed from every angle as they did not have the mirror-like metallic surface that could often make daguerreotypes difficult to view. While the daguerreotype exposure time took several minutes, the wet collodion process for ambrotypes drastically reduced the exposure time, taking from a few seconds to a minute. The shortened exposure time and the low price helped increase their popularity of ambrotypes over daguerreotypes. By the late 1850s the ambrotype was more popular than the daguerreotype. By the mid-1860s the ambrotype itself was being replaced by the tintype and paper print.
Condition Information
Part of the spine is loose.
Category
Communication Artifacts
Sub-category
Documentary Artifact
Subject of Image
Woman
Accession Number
2014-011-0058
Date Range From
1853
Date Range To
1869
Length
8.5
Width
2
Height
9.5
Units
cm
Dimension Remarks
Dimensions are of the case when it is closed. When the case is open it is 17 cm in length.
Use Conditions
Be cautious of the spine if displayed
Images
Museum / Archive
Aylmer-Malahide Museum and Archives
Date Range From
1853
Date Range To
1869
Museum / Archive
Aylmer-Malahide Museum and Archives
Description
Ambrotype of a woman sitting on a chair beside a table in case. Her arm is on the table and there is a vase of flowers on the table. On her lap appears to be trim or tatting. The image is protected under glass in a wooden frame that has a small loop to hang it. Around the image is an ornate gold metal frame. The giftform identfies the woman as possibly being Mary Anne Evans. Mary Ann Evans was born in 1811 and died in 1867 at the age of 56. She is buried in the Burdick Cemetery near Summers Corners. Ambrotypes were popular from 1854 until the mid-1860s In 1851 London sculptor Frederick Scott Archer announced his new form of photography, the wet collodion processes. This combined the most successful of daguerreotype and calotype negative methods, but it was more simple and less expensive, allowing it to be commercially viable. This method was extremely popular and became the foundation for photography for the following 140 years. In this method, a glass plate was coated with the wet collodion solution that contained light-sensitive silver salts and was exposed while the plate was still wet. Photographs had to be taken within 15 minutes of coating the plate so a portable dark room was required. The exposure time was less than daguerreotypes and calotypes, making outdoor photography easier. A sharp glass negative image was created that captured details. Positive copies could be made from the glass negative, usually albumen prints on paper. The images were sharper than those made by the calotype process and are less likely to fade. Ambrotypes, or wet collodion positives, were formed by painting the back of the glass negative image with black paint, or by placing a piece of black card there. The image was often put in a protective case, similar to that of a daguerreotype. In 1854 James Ambrose Cutting took out several patents relating to the process. He is thought to be responsible for coining the term ‘ambrotype.’ Ambrotypes were much less expensive to produce than daguerreotypes and they could be viewed from every angle as they did not have the mirror-like metallic surface that could often make daguerreotypes difficult to view. While the daguerreotype exposure time took several minutes, the wet collodion process for ambrotypes drastically reduced the exposure time, taking from a few seconds to a minute. The shortened exposure time and the low price helped increase their popularity of ambrotypes over daguerreotypes. By the late 1850s the ambrotype was more popular than the daguerreotype. By the mid-1860s the ambrotype itself was being replaced by the tintype and paper print.
Category
Communication Artifacts
Sub-category
Documentary Artifact
Subject of Image
Woman
Accession Number
2006-013-0100
Date Range From
1853
Date Range To
1869
Length
8.2
Width
1
Height
9.5
Units
cm
Images
Museum / Archive
Aylmer-Malahide Museum and Archives
Date Range From
1853
Date Range To
1869
Museum / Archive
Aylmer-Malahide Museum and Archives
Description
Ambrotype of a woman in half a case. The woman is seated in a chair beside a table. Her arm is resting on the table. Her necklace, ring, and the spine of the book are hand-tinted with gold, and her cheeks are hand-tinted pink. The front cover of the case is missing. The image is protected under glass and around the image is an ornate oval gold metal frame. The back of the case has a design including birds and flowers. The woman also appears in ambrotype 2014-011-0058. Ambrotypes were popular from 1854 until the mid-1860s In 1851 London sculptor Frederick Scott Archer announced his new form of photography, the wet collodion processes. This combined the most successful of daguerreotype and calotype negative methods, but it was more simple and less expensive, allowing it to be commercially viable. This method was extremely popular and became the foundation for photography for the following 140 years. In this method, a glass plate was coated with the wet collodion solution that contained light-sensitive silver salts and was exposed while the plate was still wet. Photographs had to be taken within 15 minutes of coating the plate so a portable dark room was required. The exposure time was less than daguerreotypes and calotypes, making outdoor photography easier. A sharp glass negative image was created that captured details. Positive copies could be made from the glass negative, usually albumen prints on paper. The images were sharper than those made by the calotype process and are less likely to fade. Ambrotypes, or wet collodion positives, were formed by painting the back of the glass negative image with black paint, or by placing a piece of black card there. The image was often put in a protective case, similar to that of a daguerreotype. In 1854 James Ambrose Cutting took out several patents relating to the process. He is thought to be responsible for coining the term ‘ambrotype.’ Ambrotypes were much less expensive to produce than daguerreotypes and they could be viewed from every angle as they did not have the mirror-like metallic surface that could often make daguerreotypes difficult to view. While the daguerreotype exposure time took several minutes, the wet collodion process for ambrotypes drastically reduced the exposure time, taking from a few seconds to a minute. The shortened exposure time and the low price helped increase their popularity of ambrotypes over daguerreotypes. By the late 1850s the ambrotype was more popular than the daguerreotype. By the mid-1860s the ambrotype itself was being replaced by the tintype and paper print.
Condition Information
The wooden case around the image is broken. The right side and bottom are detached.
Category
Communication Artifacts
Sub-category
Documentary Artifact
Subject of Image
Woman
Accession Number
2014-011-0059
Date Range From
1853
Date Range To
1869
Length
8.3
Width
1
Height
9.6
Units
cm
Images
Museum / Archive
Aylmer-Malahide Museum and Archives
Date Range From
1853
Date Range To
1869
Museum / Archive
Aylmer-Malahide Museum and Archives
Description
Ambrotype of an unknown man and woman in case. The woman is wearing a black dress with a white collar and her hands are clasped on her lap. Her earrings, rings, and brooch are hand-tinted gold. The man is wearing a suit and a bowtie. The image is protected under glass in a frame. The back of the case features a design. Ambrotypes were popular from 1854 until the mid-1860s In 1851 London sculptor Frederick Scott Archer announced his new form of photography, the wet collodion processes. This combined the most successful of daguerreotype and calotype negative methods, but it was more simple and less expensive, allowing it to be commercially viable. This method was extremely popular and became the foundation for photography for the following 140 years. In this method, a glass plate was coated with the wet collodion solution that contained light-sensitive silver salts and was exposed while the plate was still wet. Photographs had to be taken within 15 minutes of coating the plate so a portable dark room was required. The exposure time was less than daguerreotypes and calotypes, making outdoor photography easier. A sharp glass negative image was created that captured details. Positive copies could be made from the glass negative, usually albumen prints on paper. The images were sharper than those made by the calotype process and are less likely to fade. Ambrotypes, or wet collodion positives, were formed by painting the back of the glass negative image with black paint, or by placing a piece of black card there. The image was often put in a protective case, similar to that of a daguerreotype. In 1854 James Ambrose Cutting took out several patents relating to the process. He is thought to be responsible for coining the term ‘ambrotype.’ Ambrotypes were much less expensive to produce than daguerreotypes and they could be viewed from every angle as they did not have the mirror-like metallic surface that could often make daguerreotypes difficult to view. While the daguerreotype exposure time took several minutes, the wet collodion process for ambrotypes drastically reduced the exposure time, taking from a few seconds to a minute. The shortened exposure time and the low price helped increase their popularity of ambrotypes over daguerreotypes. By the late 1850s the ambrotype was more popular than the daguerreotype. By the mid-1860s the ambrotype itself was being replaced by the tintype and paper print.
Category
Communication Artifacts
Sub-category
Documentary Artifact
Subject of Image
Man and Woman
Accession Number
1978-047-0034
Date Range From
1853
Date Range To
1869
Length
9.7
Width
1.3
Height
12.2
Units
cm
Images
Museum / Archive
Aylmer-Malahide Museum and Archives
Date Range From
1853
Date Range To
1869
Museum / Archive
Aylmer-Malahide Museum and Archives
Description
Ambrotype of a man and woman seated in chairs in a wooden frame. Identified as members of the Arnup Family. The man is wearing all black. The woman is wearing a black dress with a white collar and she is wearing a bonnet with ribbons that have been hand-tinted light blue. The image is protected under glass in a wooden frame that has a small loop to hang it. Around the image is an oval gold metal frame. Ambrotypes were popular from 1854 until the mid-1860s In 1851 London sculptor Frederick Scott Archer announced his new form of photography, the wet collodion processes. This combined the most successful of daguerreotype and calotype negative methods, but it was more simple and less expensive, allowing it to be commercially viable. This method was extremely popular and became the foundation for photography for the following 140 years. In this method, a glass plate was coated with the wet collodion solution that contained light-sensitive silver salts and was exposed while the plate was still wet. Photographs had to be taken within 15 minutes of coating the plate so a portable dark room was required. The exposure time was less than daguerreotypes and calotypes, making outdoor photography easier. A sharp glass negative image was created that captured details. Positive copies could be made from the glass negative, usually albumen prints on paper. The images were sharper than those made by the calotype process and are less likely to fade. Ambrotypes, or wet collodion positives, were formed by painting the back of the glass negative image with black paint, or by placing a piece of black card there. The image was often put in a protective case, similar to that of a daguerreotype. In 1854 James Ambrose Cutting took out several patents relating to the process. He is thought to be responsible for coining the term ‘ambrotype.’ Ambrotypes were much less expensive to produce than daguerreotypes and they could be viewed from every angle as they did not have the mirror-like metallic surface that could often make daguerreotypes difficult to view. While the daguerreotype exposure time took several minutes, the wet collodion process for ambrotypes drastically reduced the exposure time, taking from a few seconds to a minute. The shortened exposure time and the low price helped increase their popularity of ambrotypes over daguerreotypes. By the late 1850s the ambrotype was more popular than the daguerreotype. By the mid-1860s the ambrotype itself was being replaced by the tintype and paper print.
Category
Communication Artifacts
Sub-category
Documentary Artifact
Subject of Image
Woman
Accession Number
2006-013-0099
Date Range From
1853
Date Range To
1869
Length
9.8
Width
1
Height
12.5
Units
cm
Images
Museum / Archive
Aylmer-Malahide Museum and Archives
Date Range From
1853
Date Range To
1869
Museum / Archive
Aylmer-Malahide Museum and Archives
Description
Ambrotype of a young boy in a case c. 1856. The boy is seated on a chair wearing a checkered top. The giftform identifies the boy as Albert Martin, the son of Henry Martin. Albert A. Martin, the son of Henry and Emily Martin, was born October 12, 1852. The inside cover of the case is lined with a patterned velvet that features a butterfly. The image is protected under glass and around the image is an oval gold metal frame. The outside of the case has a design on the front and back cover that features flowers. Ambrotypes were popular from 1854 until the mid-1860s In 1851 London sculptor Frederick Scott Archer announced his new form of photography, the wet collodion processes. This combined the most successful of daguerreotype and calotype negative methods, but it was more simple and less expensive, allowing it to be commercially viable. This method was extremely popular and became the foundation for photography for the following 140 years. In this method, a glass plate was coated with the wet collodion solution that contained light-sensitive silver salts and was exposed while the plate was still wet. Photographs had to be taken within 15 minutes of coating the plate so a portable dark room was required. The exposure time was less than daguerreotypes and calotypes, making outdoor photography easier. A sharp glass negative image was created that captured details. Positive copies could be made from the glass negative, usually albumen prints on paper. The images were sharper than those made by the calotype process and are less likely to fade. Ambrotypes, or wet collodion positives, were formed by painting the back of the glass negative image with black paint, or by placing a piece of black card there. The image was often put in a protective case, similar to that of a daguerreotype. In 1854 James Ambrose Cutting took out several patents relating to the process. He is thought to be responsible for coining the term ‘ambrotype.’ Ambrotypes were much less expensive to produce than daguerreotypes and they could be viewed from every angle as they did not have the mirror-like metallic surface that could often make daguerreotypes difficult to view. While the daguerreotype exposure time took several minutes, the wet collodion process for ambrotypes drastically reduced the exposure time, taking from a few seconds to a minute. The shortened exposure time and the low price helped increase their popularity of ambrotypes over daguerreotypes. By the late 1850s the ambrotype was more popular than the daguerreotype. By the mid-1860s the ambrotype itself was being replaced by the tintype and paper print.
Category
Communication Artifacts
Sub-category
Documentary Artifact
Subject of Image
Child
Accession Number
1986-029-0063
Date Range From
1853
Date Range To
1869
Length
8.3
Width
1.5
Height
9.5
Units
cm
Dimension Remarks
Dimensions are of the case when it is closed. When the case is open it is 16.5 in length.
Images
Museum / Archive
Aylmer-Malahide Museum and Archives
Date Range From
1853
Date Range To
1869
Museum / Archive
Aylmer-Malahide Museum and Archives
Description
Ambrotype of a young girl in a case. The giftform identifies the young girl as Miss Moore, daughter of J. Moore. The inside cover of the case is lined with a patterned velvet including flowers and leaves. The image is protected under glass. Around the image is an gold metal frame. The outside of the case has "1867 Jan" on the front. Ambrotypes were popular from 1854 until the mid-1860s In 1851 London sculptor Frederick Scott Archer announced his new form of photography, the wet collodion processes. This combined the most successful of daguerreotype and calotype negative methods, but it was more simple and less expensive, allowing it to be commercially viable. This method was extremely popular and became the foundation for photography for the following 140 years. In this method, a glass plate was coated with the wet collodion solution that contained light-sensitive silver salts and was exposed while the plate was still wet. Photographs had to be taken within 15 minutes of coating the plate so a portable dark room was required. The exposure time was less than daguerreotypes and calotypes, making outdoor photography easier. A sharp glass negative image was created that captured details. Positive copies could be made from the glass negative, usually albumen prints on paper. The images were sharper than those made by the calotype process and are less likely to fade. Ambrotypes, or wet collodion positives, were formed by painting the back of the glass negative image with black paint, or by placing a piece of black card there. The image was often put in a protective case, similar to that of a daguerreotype. In 1854 James Ambrose Cutting took out several patents relating to the process. He is thought to be responsible for coining the term ‘ambrotype.’ Ambrotypes were much less expensive to produce than daguerreotypes and they could be viewed from every angle as they did not have the mirror-like metallic surface that could often make daguerreotypes difficult to view. While the daguerreotype exposure time took several minutes, the wet collodion process for ambrotypes drastically reduced the exposure time, taking from a few seconds to a minute. The shortened exposure time and the low price helped increase their popularity of ambrotypes over daguerreotypes. By the late 1850s the ambrotype was more popular than the daguerreotype. By the mid-1860s the ambrotype itself was being replaced by the tintype and paper print.
Category
Communication Artifacts
Sub-category
Documentary Artifact
Subject of Image
Child
Accession Number
1979-007-0003
Date Range From
1853
Date Range To
1869
Length
6
Width
1.8
Height
7.3
Units
cm
Dimension Remarks
Dimensions are of the case when it is closed. When the case is open it is 12.2 cm in length.
Images
Museum / Archive
Aylmer-Malahide Museum and Archives
Date Range From
1853
Date Range To
1869
Museum / Archive
Aylmer-Malahide Museum and Archives
Description
Ambrotype of a woman in half a case. The woman is seated with her hands on her lap. She is wearing a black dress and a white collar and the brooch at her neck is hand-tinted gold. The image is protected under glass. Around the image is an ornate scalloped gold metal frame. The outside of the back cover has a design. Ambrotypes were popular from 1854 until the mid-1860s. In 1851 London sculptor Frederick Scott Archer announced his new form of photography, the wet collodion processes. This combined the most successful of daguerreotype and calotype negative methods, but it was more simple and less expensive, allowing it to be commercially viable. This method was extremely popular and became the foundation for photography for the following 140 years. In this method, a glass plate was coated with the wet collodion solution that contained light-sensitive silver salts and was exposed while the plate was still wet. Photographs had to be taken within 15 minutes of coating the plate so a portable dark room was required. The exposure time was less than daguerreotypes and calotypes, making outdoor photography easier. A sharp glass negative image was created that captured details. Positive copies could be made from the glass negative, usually albumen prints on paper. The images were sharper than those made by the calotype process and are less likely to fade. Ambrotypes, or wet collodion positives, were formed by painting the back of the glass negative image with black paint, or by placing a piece of black card there. The image was often put in a protective case, similar to that of a daguerreotype. In 1854 James Ambrose Cutting took out several patents relating to the process. He is thought to be responsible for coining the term ‘ambrotype.’ Ambrotypes were much less expensive to produce than daguerreotypes and they could be viewed from every angle as they did not have the mirror-like metallic surface that could often make daguerreotypes difficult to view. While the daguerreotype exposure time took several minutes, the wet collodion process for ambrotypes drastically reduced the exposure time, taking from a few seconds to a minute. The shortened exposure time and the low price helped increase their popularity of ambrotypes over daguerreotypes. By the late 1850s the ambrotype was more popular than the daguerreotype. By the mid-1860s the ambrotype itself was being replaced by the tintype and paper print.
Category
Communication Artifacts
Sub-category
Documentary Artifact
Subject of Image
Woman
Accession Number
2014-007-0029
Date Range From
1853
Date Range To
1869
Length
6.2
Width
0.8
Height
7.3
Units
cm
Images
Museum / Archive
Aylmer-Malahide Museum and Archives
Date Range From
1853
Date Range To
1869
Museum / Archive
Aylmer-Malahide Museum and Archives
Description
Ambrotype of a man and woman in a case. On the inside of the front cover is a portrait of a man wearing a suit. His hands are clapsed on his lap holding a book. His face has been hand-tinted pink. On the inside of the back cover is a portrait of a woman seated with her hands clapsed on her lap. She is wearing a black dress and a white bonnet on her head. The images are protected under glass and around the images are ornate gold metal frames. The outside of the case has a design on the front and back cover. Ambrotypes were popular from 1854 until the mid-1860s In 1851 London sculptor Frederick Scott Archer announced his new form of photography, the wet collodion processes. This combined the most successful of daguerreotype and calotype negative methods, but it was more simple and less expensive, allowing it to be commercially viable. This method was extremely popular and became the foundation for photography for the following 140 years. In this method, a glass plate was coated with the wet collodion solution that contained light-sensitive silver salts and was exposed while the plate was still wet. Photographs had to be taken within 15 minutes of coating the plate so a portable dark room was required. The exposure time was less than daguerreotypes and calotypes, making outdoor photography easier. A sharp glass negative image was created that captured details. Positive copies could be made from the glass negative, usually albumen prints on paper. The images were sharper than those made by the calotype process and are less likely to fade. Ambrotypes, or wet collodion positives, were formed by painting the back of the glass negative image with black paint, or by placing a piece of black card there. The image was often put in a protective case, similar to that of a daguerreotype. In 1854 James Ambrose Cutting took out several patents relating to the process. He is thought to be responsible for coining the term ‘ambrotype.’ Ambrotypes were much less expensive to produce than daguerreotypes and they could be viewed from every angle as they did not have the mirror-like metallic surface that could often make daguerreotypes difficult to view. While the daguerreotype exposure time took several minutes, the wet collodion process for ambrotypes drastically reduced the exposure time, taking from a few seconds to a minute. The shortened exposure time and the low price helped increase their popularity of ambrotypes over daguerreotypes. By the late 1850s the ambrotype was more popular than the daguerreotype. By the mid-1860s the ambrotype itself was being replaced by the tintype and paper print.
Condition Information
The image of the woman has surface scratches. The image of the man is discoloured around the outside of the image. The front of the case and back of the case have separated, and as such it has been catalogued 2014-007-0026a and 2014-007-0026b.
Category
Communication Artifacts
Sub-category
Documentary Artifact
Subject of Image
Man and Woman
Accession Number
2014-007-0026
Date Range From
1853
Date Range To
1869
Length
8
Width
2
Height
9.3
Units
cm
Dimension Remarks
Dimensions are of the case when it is closed. When the case is open it is 16 cm in length.
Images
Museum / Archive
Aylmer-Malahide Museum and Archives
Date Range From
1853
Date Range To
1869
Museum / Archive
Aylmer-Malahide Museum and Archives
Description
Ambrotype of a woman and a young girl in a case. The woman is wearing a black dress and has a long necklace on. The woman is holding an ambrotype in her hand. The young girl is sitting on the womans lap and is wearing a dress. The inside cover of the case is lined with a patterned velvet. The image is protected under glass and around the image is an ornate oval gold metal frame. The outside of the case has a design featuring an oval on the front and back cover. Ambrotypes were popular from 1854 until the mid-1860s. In 1851 London sculptor Frederick Scott Archer announced his new form of photography, the wet collodion processes. This combined the most successful of daguerreotype and calotype negative methods, but it was more simple and less expensive, allowing it to be commercially viable. This method was extremely popular and became the foundation for photography for the following 140 years. In this method, a glass plate was coated with the wet collodion solution that contained light-sensitive silver salts and was exposed while the plate was still wet. Photographs had to be taken within 15 minutes of coating the plate so a portable dark room was required. The exposure time was less than daguerreotypes and calotypes, making outdoor photography easier. A sharp glass negative image was created that captured details. Positive copies could be made from the glass negative, usually albumen prints on paper. The images were sharper than those made by the calotype process and are less likely to fade. Ambrotypes, or wet collodion positives, were formed by painting the back of the glass negative image with black paint, or by placing a piece of black card there. The image was often put in a protective case, similar to that of a daguerreotype. In 1854 James Ambrose Cutting took out several patents relating to the process. He is thought to be responsible for coining the term ‘ambrotype.’ Ambrotypes were much less expensive to produce than daguerreotypes and they could be viewed from every angle as they did not have the mirror-like metallic surface that could often make daguerreotypes difficult to view. While the daguerreotype exposure time took several minutes, the wet collodion process for ambrotypes drastically reduced the exposure time, taking from a few seconds to a minute. The shortened exposure time and the low price helped increase their popularity of ambrotypes over daguerreotypes. By the late 1850s the ambrotype was more popular than the daguerreotype. By the mid-1860s the ambrotype itself was being replaced by the tintype and paper print.
Condition Information
The red velvet insert has detached from the front cover. The insert is loosely attached to the rest of the ambrotype and the front cover has fallen off. The leather spine has detached. The piece of wood that has the loop latch has detached as well.
Category
Communication Artifacts
Sub-category
Documentary Artifact
Subject of Image
Woman and Child
Accession Number
2014-011-0060
Date Range From
1853
Date Range To
1869
Length
8
Width
1.6
Height
9.4
Units
cm
Dimension Remarks
Dimensions are of the case when it is closed. When the case is open it is 16 cm in length.
Images
Museum / Archive
Aylmer-Malahide Museum and Archives
Date Range From
1853
Date Range To
1869
Museum / Archive
Aylmer-Malahide Museum and Archives
Description
Ambrotype of a man in half a case. Photograph of Nathan L. Wood taken by Aaron Price in 1863. The man is wearing a suit and has dark hair and a beard. His cheeks are hand-tinted pink. The man is identified as Nathan L. Wood on page 4 of the Millenium History of Aylmer book. It was a part of a series of ambrotypes of prominent citizens of Aylmer taken by Aaron Price in 1863. The image is cracked diagonally across from the top left corner to the bottom right corner. The cover of the case is missing. Around the image is an ornate scalloped gold metal frame. The back of the base has a design featuring a flower. Ambrotypes were popular from 1854 until the mid-1860s. In 1851 London sculptor Frederick Scott Archer announced his new form of photography, the wet collodion processes. This combined the most successful of daguerreotype and calotype negative methods, but it was more simple and less expensive, allowing it to be commercially viable. This method was extremely popular and became the foundation for photography for the following 140 years. In this method, a glass plate was coated with the wet collodion solution that contained light-sensitive silver salts and was exposed while the plate was still wet. Photographs had to be taken within 15 minutes of coating the plate so a portable dark room was required. The exposure time was less than daguerreotypes and calotypes, making outdoor photography easier. A sharp glass negative image was created that captured details. Positive copies could be made from the glass negative, usually albumen prints on paper. The images were sharper than those made by the calotype process and are less likely to fade. Ambrotypes, or wet collodion positives, were formed by painting the back of the glass negative image with black paint, or by placing a piece of black card there. The image was often put in a protective case, similar to that of a daguerreotype. In 1854 James Ambrose Cutting took out several patents relating to the process. He is thought to be responsible for coining the term ‘ambrotype.’ Ambrotypes were much less expensive to produce than daguerreotypes and they could be viewed from every angle as they did not have the mirror-like metallic surface that could often make daguerreotypes difficult to view. While the daguerreotype exposure time took several minutes, the wet collodion process for ambrotypes drastically reduced the exposure time, taking from a few seconds to a minute. The shortened exposure time and the low price helped increase their popularity of ambrotypes over daguerreotypes. By the late 1850s the ambrotype was more popular than the daguerreotype. By the mid-1860s the ambrotype itself was being replaced by the tintype and paper print.
Condition Information
The cover of the case is missing. The image is cracked diagonally across from the top left corner to the bottom right corner.
Category
Communication Artifacts
Sub-category
Documentary Artifact
Subject of Image
Man
Accession Number
2014-007-0017
Date Range From
1853
Date Range To
1869
Length
8.2
Width
0.8
Height
9.4
Units
cm
Images
Museum / Archive
Aylmer-Malahide Museum and Archives
Date Range From
1853
Date Range To
1869
Museum / Archive
Aylmer-Malahide Museum and Archives
Description
Ambrotype of a man in a thin metal frame. Image of James McIntyre taken by Aaron Price in 1863. He is wearing a suit and his hands are holding the bottom of his jacket. He has grey hair and a grey beard. His cheeks are hand-tinted pink. The man is identified as James McIntyre on page 4 of the Millenium History of Aylmer book. It was a part of a series of ambrotypes of prominent citizens of Aylmer taken by Aaron Price in 1863. Ambrotypes were popular from 1854 until the mid-1860s In 1851 London sculptor Frederick Scott Archer announced his new form of photography, the wet collodion processes. This combined the most successful of daguerreotype and calotype negative methods, but it was more simple and less expensive, allowing it to be commercially viable. This method was extremely popular and became the foundation for photography for the following 140 years. In this method, a glass plate was coated with the wet collodion solution that contained light-sensitive silver salts and was exposed while the plate was still wet. Photographs had to be taken within 15 minutes of coating the plate so a portable dark room was required. The exposure time was less than daguerreotypes and calotypes, making outdoor photography easier. A sharp glass negative image was created that captured details. Positive copies could be made from the glass negative, usually albumen prints on paper. The images were sharper than those made by the calotype process and are less likely to fade. Ambrotypes, or wet collodion positives, were formed by painting the back of the glass negative image with black paint, or by placing a piece of black card there. The image was often put in a protective case, similar to that of a daguerreotype. In 1854 James Ambrose Cutting took out several patents relating to the process. He is thought to be responsible for coining the term ‘ambrotype.’ Ambrotypes were much less expensive to produce than daguerreotypes and they could be viewed from every angle as they did not have the mirror-like metallic surface that could often make daguerreotypes difficult to view. While the daguerreotype exposure time took several minutes, the wet collodion process for ambrotypes drastically reduced the exposure time, taking from a few seconds to a minute. The shortened exposure time and the low price helped increase their popularity of ambrotypes over daguerreotypes. By the late 1850s the ambrotype was more popular than the daguerreotype. By the mid-1860s the ambrotype itself was being replaced by the tintype and paper print.
Category
Communication Artifacts
Sub-category
Documentary Artifact
Subject of Image
Man
Accession Number
2014-007-0021
Date Range From
1853
Date Range To
1869
Length
7.1
Height
8.2
Units
cm
Images
Museum / Archive
Aylmer-Malahide Museum and Archives
Date Range From
1853
Date Range To
1869
Museum / Archive
Aylmer-Malahide Museum and Archives
Description
Ambrotype of Abram Beemer taken by Aaron Price in 1863. The man is identified as Abram Beemer on page 4 of the Millenium History of Aylmer book. It was a part of a series of ambrotypes of prominent citizens of Aylmer taken by Aaron Price in 1863. The image has a thin metal frame around it. Ambrotypes were popular from 1854 until the mid-1860s. In 1851 London sculptor Frederick Scott Archer announced his new form of photography, the wet collodion processes. This combined the most successful of daguerreotype and calotype negative methods, but it was more simple and less expensive, allowing it to be commercially viable. This method was extremely popular and became the foundation for photography for the following 140 years. In this method, a glass plate was coated with the wet collodion solution that contained light-sensitive silver salts and was exposed while the plate was still wet. Photographs had to be taken within 15 minutes of coating the plate so a portable dark room was required. The exposure time was less than daguerreotypes and calotypes, making outdoor photography easier. A sharp glass negative image was created that captured details. Positive copies could be made from the glass negative, usually albumen prints on paper. The images were sharper than those made by the calotype process and are less likely to fade. Ambrotypes, or wet collodion positives, were formed by painting the back of the glass negative image with black paint, or by placing a piece of black card there. The image was often put in a protective case, similar to that of a daguerreotype. In 1854 James Ambrose Cutting took out several patents relating to the process. He is thought to be responsible for coining the term ‘ambrotype.’ Ambrotypes were much less expensive to produce than daguerreotypes and they could be viewed from every angle as they did not have the mirror-like metallic surface that could often make daguerreotypes difficult to view. While the daguerreotype exposure time took several minutes, the wet collodion process for ambrotypes drastically reduced the exposure time, taking from a few seconds to a minute. The shortened exposure time and the low price helped increase their popularity of ambrotypes over daguerreotypes. By the late 1850s the ambrotype was more popular than the daguerreotype. By the mid-1860s the ambrotype itself was being replaced by the tintype and paper print.
Category
Communication Artifacts
Sub-category
Documentary Artifact
Subject of Image
Man
Accession Number
2014-007-0019
Date Range From
1853
Date Range To
1869
Length
7
Height
8.3
Units
cm
Images
Museum / Archive
Aylmer-Malahide Museum and Archives
Date Range From
1853
Date Range To
1869
Museum / Archive
Aylmer-Malahide Museum and Archives
Description
Ambrotype of Jerimiah Vanwaggoner taken by Aaron Price in 1863. The man is identified as Jerimiah Vanwaggoner on page 4 of the Millenium History of Aylmer book. It was a part of a series of ambrotypes of prominent citizens of Aylmer taken by Aaron Price in 1863. He is sitting in a suit with his hands clasped on his stomach. His cheeks are hand-tinted pink. Around the picture is a thin gold metal frame. Image is cracked across. Ambrotypes were popular from 1854 until the mid-1860s. In 1851 London sculptor Frederick Scott Archer announced his new form of photography, the wet collodion processes. This combined the most successful of daguerreotype and calotype negative methods, but it was more simple and less expensive, allowing it to be commercially viable. This method was extremely popular and became the foundation for photography for the following 140 years. In this method, a glass plate was coated with the wet collodion solution that contained light-sensitive silver salts and was exposed while the plate was still wet. Photographs had to be taken within 15 minutes of coating the plate so a portable dark room was required. The exposure time was less than daguerreotypes and calotypes, making outdoor photography easier. A sharp glass negative image was created that captured details. Positive copies could be made from the glass negative, usually albumen prints on paper. The images were sharper than those made by the calotype process and are less likely to fade. Ambrotypes, or wet collodion positives, were formed by painting the back of the glass negative image with black paint, or by placing a piece of black card there. The image was often put in a protective case, similar to that of a daguerreotype. In 1854 James Ambrose Cutting took out several patents relating to the process. He is thought to be responsible for coining the term ‘ambrotype.’ Ambrotypes were much less expensive to produce than daguerreotypes and they could be viewed from every angle as they did not have the mirror-like metallic surface that could often make daguerreotypes difficult to view. While the daguerreotype exposure time took several minutes, the wet collodion process for ambrotypes drastically reduced the exposure time, taking from a few seconds to a minute. The shortened exposure time and the low price helped increase their popularity of ambrotypes over daguerreotypes. By the late 1850s the ambrotype was more popular than the daguerreotype. By the mid-1860s the ambrotype itself was being replaced by the tintype and paper print.
Condition Information
The image is cracked across from the top left to the middle of the right side.
Category
Communication Artifacts
Sub-category
Documentary Artifact
Subject of Image
Man
Accession Number
2014-007-0023
Date Range From
1853
Date Range To
1869
Length
7
Height
8.4
Units
cm
Images
Museum / Archive
Aylmer-Malahide Museum and Archives
Date Range From
1853
Date Range To
1869
Museum / Archive
Aylmer-Malahide Museum and Archives
Description
Ambrotype of Russell Green taken by Aaron Price in 1863. The man is identified as Russell Green on page 4 of the Millenium History of Aylmer book. It was a part of a series of ambrotypes of prominent citizens of Aylmer taken by Aaron Price in 1863. The man is wearing a suit holding his jacket. His cheeks are hand-tinted pink. The image is in a thin metal gold frame. Ambrotypes were popular from 1854 until the mid-1860s In 1851 London sculptor Frederick Scott Archer announced his new form of photography, the wet collodion processes. This combined the most successful of daguerreotype and calotype negative methods, but it was more simple and less expensive, allowing it to be commercially viable. This method was extremely popular and became the foundation for photography for the following 140 years. In this method, a glass plate was coated with the wet collodion solution that contained light-sensitive silver salts and was exposed while the plate was still wet. Photographs had to be taken within 15 minutes of coating the plate so a portable dark room was required. The exposure time was less than daguerreotypes and calotypes, making outdoor photography easier. A sharp glass negative image was created that captured details. Positive copies could be made from the glass negative, usually albumen prints on paper. The images were sharper than those made by the calotype process and are less likely to fade. Ambrotypes, or wet collodion positives, were formed by painting the back of the glass negative image with black paint, or by placing a piece of black card there. The image was often put in a protective case, similar to that of a daguerreotype. In 1854 James Ambrose Cutting took out several patents relating to the process. He is thought to be responsible for coining the term ‘ambrotype.’ Ambrotypes were much less expensive to produce than daguerreotypes and they could be viewed from every angle as they did not have the mirror-like metallic surface that could often make daguerreotypes difficult to view. While the daguerreotype exposure time took several minutes, the wet collodion process for ambrotypes drastically reduced the exposure time, taking from a few seconds to a minute. The shortened exposure time and the low price helped increase their popularity of ambrotypes over daguerreotypes. By the late 1850s the ambrotype was more popular than the daguerreotype. By the mid-1860s the ambrotype itself was being replaced by the tintype and paper print.
Category
Communication Artifacts
Sub-category
Documentary Artifact
Subject of Image
Man
Accession Number
2014-007-0022
Date Range From
1853
Date Range To
1869
Length
7
Height
8.3
Units
cm
Images
Museum / Archive
Aylmer-Malahide Museum and Archives
Date Range From
1853
Date Range To
1869
Museum / Archive
Aylmer-Malahide Museum and Archives
Description
Ambrotype of Dr. Dancey taken by Aaron Price in 1863. The man is identified as Dr. Dancey on page 4 of the Millenium History of Aylmer book. It was a part of a series of ambrotypes of prominent citizens of Aylmer taken by Aaron Price in 1863. The man is wearing a suit and his hands are resting on a cane. The image is in a thin metal frame. Ambrotypes were popular from 1854 until the mid-1860s. In 1851 London sculptor Frederick Scott Archer announced his new form of photography, the wet collodion processes. This combined the most successful of daguerreotype and calotype negative methods, but it was more simple and less expensive, allowing it to be commercially viable. This method was extremely popular and became the foundation for photography for the following 140 years. In this method, a glass plate was coated with the wet collodion solution that contained light-sensitive silver salts and was exposed while the plate was still wet. Photographs had to be taken within 15 minutes of coating the plate so a portable dark room was required. The exposure time was less than daguerreotypes and calotypes, making outdoor photography easier. A sharp glass negative image was created that captured details. Positive copies could be made from the glass negative, usually albumen prints on paper. The images were sharper than those made by the calotype process and are less likely to fade. Ambrotypes, or wet collodion positives, were formed by painting the back of the glass negative image with black paint, or by placing a piece of black card there. The image was often put in a protective case, similar to that of a daguerreotype. In 1854 James Ambrose Cutting took out several patents relating to the process. He is thought to be responsible for coining the term ‘ambrotype.’ Ambrotypes were much less expensive to produce than daguerreotypes and they could be viewed from every angle as they did not have the mirror-like metallic surface that could often make daguerreotypes difficult to view. While the daguerreotype exposure time took several minutes, the wet collodion process for ambrotypes drastically reduced the exposure time, taking from a few seconds to a minute. The shortened exposure time and the low price helped increase their popularity of ambrotypes over daguerreotypes. By the late 1850s the ambrotype was more popular than the daguerreotype. By the mid-1860s the ambrotype itself was being replaced by the tintype and paper print.
Category
Communication Artifacts
Sub-category
Documentary Artifact
Subject of Image
Man
Accession Number
2014-007-0018
Date Range From
1853
Date Range To
1869
Length
7
Height
8.3
Units
cm
Images

13017 records – page 2 of 651.